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Browse the additional and amended entries by initial letter:

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

H

H-City An image of Denmark as a continuous urban system roughly in the shape of the letter H. The term has been used by Peter Hemmersam and Tom Nielsen (2004). They write that H-City has been in the making since the 1950s with the construction of the national motorway system, but that its potential only really became clear in 1998 with the opening of the Great Belt Bridge. The H includes Denmark's five biggest cities and two thirds of its population, as well as the Swedish city of Malma.
happy slapping An assault which an individual or gang of young people inflicts on a victim while someone films it on a mobile phone, for the entertainment of others. Michael Quinion (2005) notes that the term is a pun on 'happy snapping' for taking photographs, which goes back at least to the 1940s.
harbour city, the Sydney, Australia.
Hav The imaginary Mediterranean city described in Jan Morris's novel Last Letters from Hav, published in 1985. The book tells of, among other marvels, the annual Roof-Race. The city's most athletic youths run round the old town at roof level, 'involving jumps over more than thirty alleyways, culminating in a prodigious leap over the open space in the centre of the Bazaar, and ending desperately in a slither down the walls of the castle gate to the finish.' The author explains: 'As the horserace is to Siena, as the bull-running is to Pamplona, as Derby Day is to the English or even perhaps Bastille Day to the French, so the day of the Roof-Race is to the people of Hav. It is not known for sure how this fascinating institution began, though there are plenty of plausible theories. The race was certainly being run in the sixteenth century, when Nicander Nucius described it in passing as "a curious custom of these people"; and in 1810 Lady Hester Stanhope, the future "Queen of Palmyra", was among the spectators: she vociferously demanded the right to take part herself, and was only dissuaded by her private physician, who said it would almost certainly be the end of her. In later years the Russian aristocracy made a regular fete of it, people coming all the way from St Petersburg simply for the day, and lavish house-parties were organized in the villas of the western hills. Enormous stakes were wagered on the outcome; the winner, still covered with dust and sweat, was immediately taken to the Palace in the Governor's own carriage for a champagne breakfast and the presentation of the traditional golden goblet.' See also free running.
Head, Peter Civil and structural engineer. As head of the engineering consultancy Arup’s planning and integrated urbanism team he led the design of the Chinese eco-city of DONGTAN.
Heidelberg Project An outdoor art project in Detroit that is largely the work of Tyree Guyton. Much of it is made of items that have been discarded as rubbish. The painted polka dot is also a common motif. 'My canvas is the street, the people, the buildings and the entire world,' Guyton says. The work has been controversial, with the authorities at times branding it an intolerable mess. The city council destroyed much of it in 1991 and again in 1999.
hemcrete A building material made of hemp and lime sprayed on to a wooden framework.
hierarchitect An urban designer who bases development layouts on a hierarchy of streets and spaces, rather than designing them all to a similar width and sense of importance. The term was used by the architectural journalist Paul Finch in 2005, reflecting criticism by the architect Piers Gough of some urban designers as being excessively committed to creating such hierarchies.
higgledy-piggledy See hugger-mugger.
hoarding (UK) The US equivalent is billboard.
hole with the mint, the Llantrisant, the South Wales town that is the home of the Royal Mint. In this nickname ‘hole’ has the implication of ‘dump’.
hoodie The hood to a hooded top, as worn by urban youths in the 2000s. In 2004 Manchester Magistrates' Court banned four youths from wearing their hoodies up, as a part of a series of anti-social behaviour orders. The magistrates hoped this would 'prohibit their association with gang culture'. See also dress sense. 2 (US) A person of the neighbourhood.
Hooke, Robert (1635-1703) Scientist. As the City of London's representative on the Rebuilding Commission following the 1633 Fire of London, Hooke measured and plotted building sites. He worked closely with sir christopher wren on the new city churches.
hooli-wear designer clothes favoured by football hooligans. A list of such brands was drawn up in Leicester in 2004 by city-centre pubs anxious to identify potential troublemakers.
hooptie (US) An old car.
horse capital of the world Lexington, Kentucky.
housing demand The aspirations of the public, which may be greater than their needs.
how’m I doing? A catchphrase of Ed Koch, mayor of New York 1977-89.
hugger-mugger adj. Jumbled up together; higgledy-piggledy. In an urbanistic context the term is often used to denote a positive quality of a place. Example: 'The new development has none of the delightful hugger-mugger quality of the old town.' In use beyond urbanism the term has two meanings: 1 Confused or muddled. 2 Secret. The origin of the term is unclear. Also a noun and an adverb.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

Tradition is in the life of the community what memory is for its individual units.
Patrick Geddes

   
illustration from the Dictionary of Urbanism