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I

ichnography 1 A ground plan. 2 The art or process of drawing ground plans. From the Greek for track and drawing.
icon-monger A pejorative term for an architect who designs buildings intended to become icons, whether or not that is appropriate.
iconic adj. Representing something particularly significant and distinctive. Examples: 'Views can be enhanced by buildings [such as] the first iconic glistening building at Canary Wharf before it was compromised by its recent lumpy brothers'; 'Most people outside Liverpool are familiar with a number of its iconic structures: the buildings of the Pier Head, the Albert Dock, St George's Hall or the two cathedrals. There is no general agreement on what constitutes an iconic building. In the words of one writer (Pardey, 2001): 'It only takes one iconic building to make a great city, as Sydney proved in the 1960s, so London should be thankful that it has three in the Tower, St Paul's and the Houses of Parliament. Our age does not yet promise a fourth.' Most people, though, would judge that in London the Lloyd's Building and 1 Canada Square at Canary Wharf (in addition to a fourth classic, Tower Bridge) make the grade. In the wake of the destruction by terrorists of the world trade center, a London developer was quoted (in Garlick and Loney, 2001) as arguing that his company's proposed skyscrapers (designed by Lord Foster for a site at Elephant and Castle) were not likely to be a target for terrorists as they were not 'iconic' buildings. In 2003 the architect Peter Cook became probably the first person to define himself as iconic. 'I regard myself as a collaborator,' he told the Architects' Journal (2003), 'even though I'm identified as an iconic creature.' See also statue.
iconophobia Fear of iconic buildings, or of the fashion for building them. Example: 'Among architects at least, we might be on the verge of a new iconophobia' (2004). See also landmarkitis.
Illich, Ivan (1926-2002) Writer and teacher. Illich was a strong critic of the debilitating influence of professions on the ability of people to influence and change their environment. See conviviality and walking.
in tandem The relationship between two buildings, one of which is in the grounds of the other, sharing its highway access rather than having separate access.
in-and-out-town One that is insufficiently attractive for most visitors to spend any longer there than is necessary.
inclusive visioning The term was included in a list of missing skills by the UK Department of Communities and Local Government. The House of Commons Communities and Local Government Committee wrote in 2008 that the phrase ‘appears to mean working out what an area needs’.
indirect potable reuse (US) Reusing waste water after treating it, injecting it into the ground and drawing it from wells. This is a more publicly acceptable way of recycling waste water than just purifying it and recycling it as drinking water directly, which critics of such schemes call ‘toilet-to-tap’. Example: ‘Say “indirect potable reuse” if you want people to accept the idea that their kids will be making lemonade with water that was flushed down the toilet or used to mop the porch.’
insula (Latin) A city block.
insula (Latin) 1 A residential building of four or more storeys, divided into apartments intended for rent. By the fourth century the term may have been applied to single apartments (Lançon, 2000). 2 A street block. 3 An island.
internet café One that offers internet access as well as beverages. The world's first opened in central London in 1994.
interpretation Explaining the historical, economic, social and cultural background to a building or place. The Association for Heritage Interpretation defines it as 'the art of helping people explore and appreciate our world'.
intersection (US) The UK equivalent is crossroads.
invisible infrastructure Infrastructure that makes a particular activity possible, without being specifically adapted to it. Example: 'It is sometimes possible to cater for the needs of pedestrians and cyclists without providing measures such as cycle lanes and subways. Such invisible infrastructure is very important.'
involvee A person on the receiving end of a process of PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT. The term was recorded in 2006.
Ironopolis Middlesbrough, so called in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries when it was an important centre of heavy industry. Middlesbrough Ironopolis Football Club played briefly in the Football League in the 1890s.
iter (Latin) A path or right of way (Laurence, 1999). Compare actus, semina and via.

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Americans feel uncomfortable sitting in a square. They should be working at the office or at home with the family looking at television.
Robert Venturi

   
illustration from the Dictionary of Urbanism