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L

land bridge A bridge that is sufficiently wide and whose approaches are sufficiently gentle to give people crossing it the impression that they are still on the ground.
landmarkitis An architect's compulsion to design landmarks on every occasion, even where a less assertive building would be more appropriate. See also iconophobia.
landscape urbanism Designing and planning open space using landscape as the structuring medium. Christopher Gray writes: ‘Landscape urbanism considers the horizontal field over the vertical figure-ground. It describes a move from the pictorial to the operational: process (both in analysis and design synthesis) is favoured over a determined end form’.
letraset people Standard figures in architectural drawings created by the Letraset system of dry transfers, widely used in the 1960s and '70s. Letraset people commonly gave a semblance of life to drawings of proposed spaces, which when built turned out to be lifeless due to being badly designed and unconnected to pedestrian routes.
Leverburgh A village on the Isle of Harris in the Western Isles of Scotland. Originally named Obbe, it was renamed in 1920 after the soap manufacturer Lord Leverhulme (WILLIAM HESKETH LEVER) bought the South Harris estate and planned to transform it into a major fishing port. He built a harbour with berths for 50 herring drifters, a fish processing site, and houses for his managers. Leverhulme’s even more ambitious plans never came to fruition as he died in 1925. Lever Brothers abandoned the project (the houses are all that remains of it) and sold off the estate.
libeskind Drunk. Alan Dunlop (2004) reports hearing the word being used with this meaning (in a Glasgow architects' office), in reference to the architect daniel libeskind's frequent use of sloping walls and ceilings.
life-expired Having reached the end of its expected or possible life. Example: 'Everyone was glad to see the life-expired housing being demolished.' The term tends to suggest that the life can not be extended, although often it could be.
liner building A building of shallow depth that helps to line the street and create a relatively lively street frontage by masking a parking lot, blank-walled building or other dead feature behind it.
link A connection between two nodes in a transport network.
local landscape designation (UK) Established by a local council to provide extra protection to a locally important landscape.
localise To concentrate on local activities; the converse of globalising. Example: 'Our aim is to localise urban life, reducing the need for people to travel.' Also relocalise.
location-efficient mortgage (US) Offered by a bank to home buyers who live close to transit lines, work or services.
locative art Projects using mobile communications technology (such as global positioning systems, wireless internet and mobile phones) exploring interactions between people and places for artistic purposes.
locative media A term used to describe projects exploring ways in which mobile communications technology (such as global positioning systems, wireless internet and mobile phones) can promote social interaction and the understanding of places. Karlis Kalnins, a pioneer of such work, has used the term in this sense since around 2001.
London Nobody Knows, The A book by Geoffrey Fletcher, published in 1962, about poverty and other aspects of everyday London, and the 1967 documentary film, directed by Norman Cohen, that was based on it.
Londonographer One who writes about London.
loose-fit building One that is easily adaptable to a variety of uses. Example: 'Buildings can be loose-fit and adaptable - indeed they must be, for we need to be able to knock them about, nail pictures in, renew them' (Fraser, 2003). See alex gordon.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

The fact there is no route-map to utopia does not mean that there are no routes to more accessible destinations.
Colin Ward

   
illustration from the Dictionary of Urbanism