Urbanwords: the website of The Dictionary of Urbanism


Supplement

HOME
REVIEWS
INTRODUCTION
LIST OF ENTRIES
QUOTATIONS
SUPPLEMENT
CONTRIBUTE
REFERENCES
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
BUY THE BOOK
LINKS
PLANDEMONIUM
COPYRIGHT
 

Browse the additional and amended entries by initial letter:

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

P

paradigm A full and consistent framework of ideas which creates an individual's world view. People will generally adjust their perception of reality to conform to the paradigm which they hold rather than questioning the paradigm itself.
paradigm shift The total change in attitude and consciousness which is required for an individual to reject their current paradigm and adopt a new one.
parcotrain (French) Station car park; park and ride car park.
parkour free running; the extreme urban sport of running, jumping and climbing over walls, rooftops and other features.
Paxton, Joseph (Sir) (1801-65) Designer and planner. Paxton began his working life as a gardener. By 1826 he was superintendent of the Duke of Devonshire's gardens at Chatsworth, where he designed green houses with innovative glass and metal roofs. He drew on this experience in designing the prefabricated iron and glass crystal palace for the 1851 Great Exhibition. He designed the village of Edensor on the Chatsworth estate and birkenhead park. In 1865 he proposed a 16-mile long, glass arcade around London, to be called the Great Victorian Way. This 'girdle', served by multi-level railways, would contain shops, cafes and hotels (Colquhoun, 2003).
Peabody Trust A philanthropic provider of housing, founded in the UK in 1862 by the American merchant George Peabody. The sombre, identikit tenements built by the trust in its early years are instantly recognisable all over inner London, as is the epithet 'Peabody' applied to them. In the 1990s the trust, still a major developer, gained a reputation for being at the forefront of new thinking about housing design. See also bedzed, henry darbishire, samuel lewis housing trust and tenement.
peeps (US) People, particularly the people of a neighbourhood.
Perfection The nicely ironic name of the fictional small American dustbowl town that is the setting for the 1990 film 'Tremors', directed by Ron Underwood. The people of the town are trapped by monsters that burrow through the ground.
personal rapid transit

Small computer-controlled vehicles travelling over a fixed guideway.

phonography See FIELD RECORDING.
pioneering city, the Hull, according to the body entrusted with the job of rebranding the city after it was designated in The Idler magazine in 2003 as top of the list of Britain's 'crap towns'. (It was not all bad news: Hull was also credited in The Idler for its friendliness and - damned with faint praise, perhaps - imaginative street names.)
pla gwyn, y (Welsh) The white plague. The architect Bowen Dann Davies used the term as early as 1939 to describe the whitewashing of cottages in Wales. This practice hid the stone that, he felt, was such an important element of the spirit of the place (Weston, 2002).
planning and design statement A document describing the planning and design principles and the site and area appraisals on which a planning application is based. Some local authorities asked applicants for planning permission to submit such statements before the UK government introduced a general requirement for design statements in 2005. See also statement of design principles.
Plaza of Three Cultures, Mexico City Completed in 1964, the plaza is surrounded by Aztec, Spanish and modern Mestizo (people of mixed ancestry) buildings and ruins. See also city of three cultures.
plazzy scouser Someone who claims to be a scouser but lives outside Liverpool. Plazzy means plastic or fake.
plebs urbana (Latin) The commoners of a city, as opposed to the plebs rustica, those from the country.
plop art A pejorative term for a work of public art placed with little consideration of its setting. The term recalls the more familiar 'pop art'.
postcard The image of a town or city that might be illustrated on a picture postcard; the buildings that make up that image.
postcard architecture Buildings well enough known to be featured on picture postcards; landmark or iconic buildings.
pov housing (Australia) Low-cost or poverty housing.
preserved in aspic A pejorative term for a place whose positive features have led to its physical form being restored or maintained at a pitch of perfection more appropriate to a museum than to a living, changing, contemporary environment. Aspic is a savoury jelly used as a protective glaze or mould for items of food. The word, from the French, supposedly derives from the resemblance between the colour of aspic and that of an asp.
pseudo-urbanism A development project that is intended to enrich urban life but which is carried out at too small a scale (constructing a single building, for example) to achieve it (Van Kuilenburg, 2004).
public involvement Members of the public playing an active part in processes of urban change. In 2005 the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) inflicted some more unnecessary jargon on the world of planning. For years planners have used the terms public involvement, public participation, public engagement and public consultation more or less interchangeably. The RTPI has decided that this is unacceptable. Its solution has been to define each term 'with precision'. There are two problems with this. First, the complex relationship between planners and the public does not fit neatly into four categories. Second, the RTPI's recommended definitions are so opaque as to be useless. The only consequence will be that some planners, who previously would have explained what they meant, will now use one of the official terms, assuming erroneously that the public will know what they mean. The result: even less understanding than before. What is the RTPI thinking? Its guidance note explains. 'The phrase "community engagement" causes considerable confusion for it is often used as an umbrella term to cover the whole range of public involvement and consultation. In fact it has a precise meaning.' Well, if the phrase is used as an umbrella term and also has a more precise meaning, it clearly has at least two meanings. The English language is like that. To insist that the meaning which the RTPI prefers is the only one that should be used in future is futile, especially as its favoured definition is so hard to distinguish from the others. The RTPI's definitions are as follows: Public (or community) involvement: effective interactions between planners, decision-makers, individual and representative stakeholders to identify issues and exchange views on a continuous basis. Participation: the extent and nature of activities undertaken by those who take part in public or community involvement. Public (or community) engagement: Actions and processes taken or undertaken to establish effective relationships with individuals or groups so that more specific interactions can then take place. Consultation: The dynamic process of dialogue between individuals or groups, based upon a genuine exchange of views, and normally with the objective of influencing decisions, policies or programmes of action. (Guidelines on Effective Community Involvement and Consultation: RTPI Good Practice Note 1, Royal Town Planning Institute, London 2005).
pylon See column.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

We created a landscape of scary places, and we became a nation of scary people.
James Howard Kunstler

   
illustration from the Dictionary of Urbanism