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R

rabbit run A place (particularly in a shopping centre) where a large number of pedestrians pass by.
rale (Wessex) To walk.
re-imagine (also reimagine) To explore radical new possibilities. Example: 'Princeton architects reimagine World Trade Center site' (headline in the Princeton Weekly Bulletin in 2002); 'Students re-imagine city landmarks' (student bulletin in Madison, Wisconsin in 2001). Paul Finch, interim chairman of the commission for architecture and the built environment, used the term in his foreword to the commission's 2003/04 annual report (published in August 2004). Elected members, planners and housing professionals, among others, needed to be helped 'to think again about their role', Finch wrote. 'We all need to re-imagine ourselves as a body of professionals before we can re-imagine the buildings and spaces where we live and work'. Re-imagine! was the title of a 2003 book by the management guru Tom Peters exploring radical ways of overcoming outdated, traditional company values. In 1993 the 'Re-imagining' conference (re-imagining God, and challenging traditional doctrines and symbols) was held in Minneapolis as part of the Ecumenical Decade.
read To be understandable or legible (see legibility). Example: 'The monumental tower, designed as a counterpoint to that of St Martin's, now reads internally as well as externally.'
reading capital of the world Tifton, Georgia. The city gave itself the name as part of an attempt to raise its low levels of literacy.
recording brief Guidance written by a local authority to an applicant for planning permission for development relating to a historic building, explaining how the building should be recorded. Shane Gould (2004) writes: 'The brief should underpin the entire process by describing why the work needs to be undertaken, the area and level of investigation, proposed methodology, content and distribution of reports and, if appropriate, archive arrangements and future publication. It enables the applicant to obtain competitive costings from a range of competent organisations and forms the basis of the contractors' specification.' Gould notes: 'A specification, written scheme of investigation or project design gives a detailed account of how the objectives outlined in the brief are to be met, the qualifications and expertise of all project personnel, monitoring arrangements, and a timetable for completing each stage of the project. The resulting document must be validated by the local authority before the start of any recording work.'
red tape Excessively restrictive bureaucratic regulations. The government’s view of the difference between red tape and useful regulation can change with government policy. Example: ‘Today I am scrapping the red tape so it is much easier to convert the loft into that extra bedroom and build on an extension’ (UK housing and planning minister Caroline Flint speaking in 2008).
regentrification (US) The same as gentrification.
relocalise See localise.
residentialise (transitive) To increase the amount of residential accommodation in an area previously dominated by other uses. The term is also used intransitively.
retail elephant A business that dominates an area.
right-size (verb) (US) To plan infrastructure and levels of service appropriate to the size that a city is expected to grow or shrink to. The term is sometimes used as a more positive way of describing the process of managing decline (downsizing).
Riley, Joseph P (b1943) Mayor of Charleston for seven terms, after first being elected in 1975. He has led the successful revitalisation of historic downtown Charleston through public-private partnerships. Early in his administration he created the Office of the Ombudsman and Citizen Participation, and an Office of Neighborhood Services, which has fostered the creation of 70 neighborhood associations. He was a founder of the Mayors' Institute for City Design, which provides support on urban design issues to mayors across America. He was the first recipient of the Urban Land Institute's prize for visionary urban development. He received the 1994 Thomas Jefferson public architecture award from the American Institute of Architects for 'his exceptional leadership and Jeffersonian vision in redefining the promise and, ultimately, the future of our nation and its cities'.
roadmap A written description or broad framework.
Romulus The legendary founder and first king of Rome.
row One of a network of narrow ALLEYS linking Yarmouth’s three main streets. There were 145 rows in the sixteenth century. Many were destroyed by bombing in the second world war and by later clearances. Being too narrow for normal carts, a special cart known as a TROLL was used.
rural area (US) Defined by the National Rural Development Department as 'all the territory of a State that is not within the boundaries of any standard metropolitan statistical area, and all territory within any standard metropolitan statistical area within a census tract having a population density of less than 20 persons per square mile'.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

Kill the street.
  Le Corbusier

   
illustration from the Dictionary of Urbanism