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T

Teague, Walter Dorwin See city of light.
ten commitments A ten-point voluntary code adopted by mobile phone operators. It covers the location of mobile phone masts, among other matters.
tenure blind Designed so that the appearance of individual buildings (in a housing scheme, for example) does not reflect their tenure. 
terrain 1 The surface characteristics of an area of land. 2 A particular geographical area.
territorialise To take over space. Example: 'Public domain is being territorialized by private activity.'
territorialise To take over the use of space. Example: 'Public domain is being territorialized by private activity.'
Thames Town A satellite town of Shanghai, China, built in 2006 to designs by the UK consultant Atkins in what is supposed to be the style of a traditional small English town. It consists of five gated communities.
thankful village One of the few villages in England with a memorial recording the fact that all the people who left to fight or nurse in the first world war (or in a few cases the second) came back safely.
thee-thou A person from Sheffield, so called from the traditional use of the second person singular pronoun forms 'thee' and 'thou' in that city. Stoddart, Upton and Widdowson (1999) note that thee and thou were 'traditionally male preserves in the locality and largely eschewed by women... [who] strongly objected to men using these pronouns to address them'.
tick and flick planning (Australia) A pejorative term for a prescriptive approach to planning control (based on checking a development proposal against categories on a checklist, and flicking over quickly to the next page, rather than assessing the proposal according to performance criteria).
tidal bounce See ocean-tide loading.
Tin Pan Alley 1 The part of New York City (centred on part of West 28th Street, and not an actual alley) where publishers and writers of popular music were concentrated in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The name may refer to the cacophony of music coming from the area’s buildings. 2 The popular music industry in the USA. This generic use derives from the previous one. 3 Any part of a city where music publishers and music shops are concentrated. Denmark Street in London, known as Britain’s Tin Pan Alley since the 1920s, is an example.
toilet The availability of toilets is proposed by the British Toilets Association and the World Toilets Organisation as an important measure of the quality of public space. The Victorians, understanding this, provided an extensive network of lavishly appointed surface and underground public conveniences in their towns and cities. Many of these have been closed in recent years, sometimes converted to other uses such as bars, restaurants and tanning salons. In some cases they have been replaced by a usually inadequate number of coin-operated concrete-pillbox 'superloos'. The alternative term lavatory is used by an increasingly narrow upper social class and the National Trust. See also conveniologist.
toilet-to-tap See indirect potable reuse.
toleration zone An area of Rotterdam designed for use by heroin-addicted prostitutes. Michelle Provoost and Wouter Vanstiphout (2004) comment that it 'shows the deep idealistic core of urbanism: a discipline that believes that society can design its way out of even the cruellest and most desperate metropolitan phenomena. The zone presents to us the best and the worst of Dutch planning: its deep idealism and its hopeless bureaucratisation. But most of all it speaks of a world seldom seen in the Photoshop images of young architects: a world of poverty, sickness, decline and emptiness that glows with a strange neo-gothic beauty.'
toon (Glasgow) A town.
toon, go doon the 1 To go out on the town. In Newcastle the phrase is likely to be gan doon the toon. 2 To work as a prostitute; to walk the streets.
toon, go doon the To work as a prostitute; to walk the streets.
traceur A free runner; one who practices free running or parkour.
tract (US) A section of a municipality by which the Census Bureau counts.
tract 1 An extended area of land. 2 A specified area of land. From the Latin tractus, a course or space.
tract housing One of many similar houses developed at the same time on a piece of land.
transfer of development rights (US) A legal mechanism allowing developers to develop at higher than normal project densities in growth areas if they buy or trade rights with people who own land in other places.
transition town A town or village, or part of a town or city, whose people aim to find alternatives to generating energy from oil and drastically to reduce carbon emissions to reduce the effects of climate change. The transition towns movement was founded in 2005 by environmentalist Rob Hopkins in Kinsale, Ireland and Totnes, England (which was the first to be declared a transition town).
tree lawn (Great Lakes, especially northeastern Ohio) A grass strip between a pavement (sidewalk) and a street (American Heritage Dictionary).
triple E (US) Engineering, enforcement and education: traditionally the three means of making traffic safe. Compare second-generation traffic calming.
troll A type of two-wheeled cart (12 feet long by three feet wide) once used in the narrow ROWS of Yarmouth.
trophy home A large and ostentatious house. Example: 'The developer is no stranger to the riches to be had from neogeo and tudorbethan executive homes. What struck in his craw was that a rival developer had the nerve to build not just one or two trophy homes, but an entire estate' (2003).
Trump, Donald (b1946) Developer and dealmaker. He came close to bankruptcy in the 1990s but later remade his fortune developing skyscrapers in New York. His taste for extravagant opulence has earned him the description 'the clown prince of kitsch'.
turquoise belt A strip of green land next to a river.
Tuscan (Queensland, Australia) A pejorative term for a nondescript style of housing that draws on a few vaguely classical elements and takes no account of the local climate or styles and methods of building.
twin cities, the Minneapolis and St Paul, two cities in Minnesota joined in one metropolitan area.
two point four children The average number of children in a family is jokingly said to be 2.4. After the figure was once quoted as an official statistic, the notion of 0.4 of a child proved memorable. Example: 'New Ash Green in the epitomy of middle-management, 2.4 children, Stepford-Wives, Brookside-on-acid, Daily Mail reading, suburban hell'. By 2002 the figure had declined to 1.64.
typomorphology 1 The classification of types of (urban) form. 2 Generating urban form through specifying types of building or layout.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

Urbanity is not so mysterious. Good space is used space.
Bill Hillier

   
illustration from the Dictionary of Urbanism