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W

walking city One where walking is the most convenient way of getting about.
wardmote A meeting which all electors in a ward of the CITY OF LONDON are entitled to attend to raise issues of concern or to meet the election candidates in a contested ward. Historically a wardmote had a role as a court of law in relation some local matters.
white elephant A building or structure that turns out to be an expensive and embarrassing failure. Example: 'We have pledged to produce facilities of excellence without extravagance so that London is not burdened with white elephants' (Sebastian Coe, chairman of London's bid for the 2012 Olympics, in 2004). White elephants are revered in Thailand, where it is said that officials who offended the royal family were sometimes given a white elephant, whose upkeep could impose a ruinous burden. A hotel in the form of a white elephant, built in 1885 on Coney Island, New York, was a celebrated financial disaster.
win Some people object to the use of the word to describe the obtaining of planning permission, as in 'we hope to win planning permission'. Michael Thomas (2003) has written: 'While the process may often feel like a battle won against huge odds, the fundamental position remains that the applicant is entitled to a consent unless the "proposed development would cause demonstrable harm to interests of acknowledged importance".'
windshield time Periods spent in a car either working or driving to work.
World Capital City of Pop Liverpool, so named in the 2000s by The Guinness Book of Records. The city was the home of The Beatles (1960-70), one of the world’s most successful pop groups.

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In architecture, form is a noun; in industry, form is a verb.
Buckminster Fuller

   
illustration from the Dictionary of Urbanism