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Y

Yarco A local nickname for Great Yarmouth, Norfolk.
yard 1 (UK) A paved, utilitarian area beside a house. 2 (US) A space next to a house that is largely given over to grass. The equivalent word in the UK is garden. See also lawn. 3 A piece of land enclosed for a particular activity.
yob culture The habitual practice of anti-social behaviour by young people.
yuppie A young upwardly mobile professional person; a young urban professional. The latter meaning is more common in the US, though both are heard in the US and UK. Yuppie is sometimes a pejorative term - 'yuppie values encompass greed, ambition, selfishness...,' writes Sam Whimster (1992) - though as late as 2000 a letter to the etiquette correspondent of The Times began: 'My wife and I are expecting our first child and, post-yuppies that we are, wish to have a proper birth announcement printed...' In the UK, thrusting young people with large amounts of disposable income seemed to be the image of Thatcherism. Whimster found that foreign-exchange dealers in London spoke of eurobond dealers (who tended to come from middle-class backgrounds and be highly educated) as yuppies, and the eurobond dealers called the foreign exchange dealers yuppies. The use of the word peaked in the late 1980s. Two more recent examples lack the pejorative connotation: 'Will Alsop's team has produced architectural collages, splashed all over the magazines, which look a bit like Daniel Libeskind on ecstasy: a great wheeze, but will it sell to the yuppie punters?' (Sir Peter Hall on Urban Splash's proposals for East Manchester, in 2002); 'There exists a "them and us" divide [in poundbury, Dorset] between Porsche-driving yuppies and retired professionals... and the subsidised housing association tenants... Graduate high flier Emma Heron says: "The village is a little lifeless and dull. I'm hoping more yuppies will move in"' (Daily Express, 2002). The yuppie lifestyle featured in novels such as Jay McInerney's Bright Lights, Big City (published in 1984 and filmed in 1988), Brett Easton Ellis' Less Than Zero (published in 1985), Tom Wolfe's the bonfire of the vanities (published in 1987 and filmed in 1990), Michael Chabon's The Mysteries of Pittsburgh (published 1988), and before that in the French novelist George Perec's 1965 novel Things (first published in English in 1990).#The word's US antecedents include YP (signifying a young professional, a term from the west coast of the USA), preppie (a product of an expensive private school), hippy (a follower of the 1960s and '70s counterculture) and yippy (a member of the radical Youth International Party). An early use of yuppie has been recorded in a story in the Chicago Tribune in 1983. The transformation from yippy to yuppie mirrors the decline of the counterculture (which, as Whimster notes, represented a rejection of the values of career, suburban life and conventional politics) and some young peoples' enthusiastic embrace of all that the counterculture had opposed. The acronym yuppie spawned many variants of the species, such as dinky (dual income, no kids yet).

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Concern for such relics will sap national vitality.
Harold Macmillan on the Euston Arch

   
illustration from the Dictionary of Urbanism